Day in the life of our Midwives

A look into an average day for a Midwife

We reached out to a couple of our experienced midwives to ask what a day in the life looks like for them.

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo Jayne Utting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo (left) is both a practising nurse and a midwife who can provide expert evidence. Her midwifery experience includes various roles within a maternity setting, including low-risk and high-risk pregnancy care, emergency obstetric care and the post-operative management of women who have undergone caesarean sections, traumatic births and babies who have sustained birth injuries, and maternal and foetal safeguarding both in the inpatient and outpatient setting.

Jayne Marie (right) is a highly experienced midwife with over 23 years of in all aspects of maternity services and midwifery practice both as a clinical midwife and senior manager. Jayne has a string background in maternity clinical governance and has extensive experience of serious incidents, never events and other complex cases within the sphere of maternity care.

 

Why did you want to become a Midwife?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

I became a midwife because my parents inspired me to do so. Although I had all the options available to myself and no pressure to study for one thing or the other, seeing my parents in their roles as an Obstetrician (father) and nurse and midwife (my mother), inspired me to look after people in a way their beloved ones can’t. Also, the healthcare system in countries like the one I am originally from in Subsaharian, Africa, motivated me to pursue a career in healthcare and in future, possibly contribute to improve healthcare outcomes at a global level in any way I can through my passion for nursing and midwifery.

Jayne Marie

I wanted to become a midwife to help women and provide care for families. I was 20 when I started my training and I still love it to this day. I am also a university lecturer, and this involves extension academic skills and research. I am always researching and reading, and my working day never really stops.

 

How long have you been an expert in the field of Midwifery?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

I have been doing Expert Witness work since mid-2022, having recently completed the Civil Law and Procedures training by Bond Solon, certified by Cardiff University. Having and still being involved in clinical work, Expert Witness work has given me a different perspective, offering me the opportunity to see things through a different lens and not just the ‘hands-on’ clinical side of things.

Jayne Marie

I achieved the CUBS diploma in 2021 and have been receiving instructions since then. With my experience in senior midwifery management, risk and governance I developed and interest in litigation and hence why I done my training.

 

What kind of education/training does your career require?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

Depends on your ‘direction of travel’ and your interests. Mines are global health, health inequalities and workforce inequalities as well as high risk pregnancies. Because of the nature of my interests, I am halfway through my PhD, having completed a Nursing qualification, a midwifery qualification and a Master of Science in research in midwifery. I gained a scholarship at a university to complete a PhD, which is the highest level of academic achievement one can get and so far, I have three first authorship publications. So essentially it depends on the journey you are on and the impact, influence and contributions to public services and society you want to make.

Jayne Marie

Midwifery is a degree entry career. The degree is a 3-year full time programme with 50% practice and 50% theory.

 

What do you enjoy most about being a Midwife?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

Giving people a voice, caring for those most vulnerable, a hug, a handshake or a ‘thank you’ from the people I look after a day of work well done.

Jayne Marie

Helping women make the scariest yet enriching transition in their entire life.

 

What does a typical day look like for you?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

I get up. Jump in the shower, have a coffee, go through my e-mails and PhD tasks for the day. I always start pretty much the same way, I jump in the shower and have a coffee and I make my way to a clinical shift or go through a case I have been assigned.

Jayne Marie

I am a midwifery lecturer as well as a midwife. I am constantly learning and developing my skills and knowledge.

 

What advice would you offer someone wanting to become a Midwife?

 

Maria Buaki-Sogo

Solid foundations I am extremely grateful for my nursing and the skills that came with it. They gave me a solid back bone, gives me a feeling of safety, make feel like I am the ‘full package’ Especially now that midwifery is highly pressurised and the demographics of the population, we care for are changing, becoming more challenging and at times complex. Have a role model, someone to inspire you and help you see who you want to be in years’ time.

Jayne Marie

I get asked how to become a midwife daily. It is about not only having a passion for helping women but having the ability to multi-task, work in a team, be a diplomat and deal with very challenging circumstances on so many differing subjects.

 

If you need to instruct an expert witness or need to talk to a member of our team about your case, you can call us on 01865 587 865 or email office@expertcourtreports.co.uk.